About your Search

20100101
20100131
STATION
CSPAN2 37
CSPAN 33
CNN 32
WHUT (Howard University Television) 28
FOXNEWS 23
MSNBC 22
WETA 16
HLN 11
WMPT (PBS) 11
WRC (NBC) 7
WBAL (NBC) 5
WJLA (ABC) 4
WTTG 4
CNBC 3
WJZ (CBS) 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 243
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 243 (some duplicates have been removed)
as the standard for their aspirations of course, the disappointed the arab world and the united states to nothing to prevent to the partition of the arab lands or those countries empires nor did american come to the assistance of the arab world when the united states returned after the second world war it was a dominant power to subordinate the middle east with priorities but with the election of barack obama united states seem to be on the threshold of a new era of positive and engagement and i have come here he told his audience to seek a new beginning between the united states and moslems around the world based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. he spoke of years of mistrust and of the needs to say openly of the things that we say in our hearts. there must be a sustained effort to listen to each other and learn from each other and to seek common ground. this language of mutual respect and understanding represented a total reversal of policies to the white house. gone was the language of the war on terror obamacare had requested staffers gone was the ambiguity over torture that had underm
shows the global imbalance, which has more to do with fiscal policies in the united states, the household savings rates in the united states and the distortions in china, which inflates their savings rate artificially. that has to do with the international exchange. the international exchange is essentially a way for these economies to be adapting to the pressures and these distortions, which really have to do with the domestic policy. >> since the issue is so important and so treacherous, i would like to ask if the other panelists have any comments for this question. >> let me complain about this component, the most concerning aspect of this is in the financial sector. this is being promoted by many people in the official sector, who say that one way to make the system safer is to do this. this is, in a way, very understandable because of the problems that many of the smaller countries or dealing with. if we go down this route and we have protectionism with financial services, this will carry with it some bad implications. the least of which is that much of the growth in t
at a still unfolding economic disaster. the united states goes after al qaeda in yemen. we will talk about it on our roundtable tonight. and who says the news business is dead? in taiwan, they're drawing new viewers by animating it all. >>> from the different perspectives of reporters and analysts from around the world, this is "worldfocus." major support has been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. welcome to "worldfocus." i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the global economy and news of the key economic barometer, unemployment. in this country, the government said today it held steady at 10% last month as moyers cut 85,000 jobs which was more than expected. the news was disappointing in europe. in the 16 countries that used the euro as their currency, the jobless wrought was also 10%. in this case, for the month of november, up from 9.9% in octob
and united states are going to continue to cooperate so as to be more effective in preventing radical islamic terrorism and prosecuting it when it arises. we shared information with secretary napolitano. and in due course, people spoke and your contributed to that debate. we also came up with an joint statement. it's a eu-u.s. statement. it's an important resolution. it's based on aviation security in particular. and you'll get that text at the end of this press conference. we mention a number of points that are dear to us all. we're talking here about the risk of terrorists, basically the same risk on both sides of the -- i think we want to protect our principals and values. our way of life. and those attacks of course by terrorism. we also share -- say that we share responsibility for fighting terrorism to ensure safety and security for our citizens. i think we all share many of these international values. we talk about a number of objectives and measures. objectives have a lot to do with aviation security. if we've learned anything from the spoiled attack over detroit is that flighted stil
been this delay. >> the former president of the united states, bill clinton, take it, has been spending time with the president today at the white house. what do weigh know about this? >> you know, it is interesting because we saw him come here to the white house to have a meeting with the president. we asked about that when we saw him arrive here. we were told that he came and was simply in town. and came here to stop by and meet with the president and also meet with other officials here at the white house. we don't know if he's still here. . beyond that we don't know anything else about that meeting. it does seem interesting the timing of this while this is all taking place, the former president, bill clinton did come by the white house. >> stand by. we will be getting back to you. once again, we are awaiting the president. he's supposed to come out around 4:30 p.m. eastern, 27 minutes or so from now. let's bring in our -- our panel, national security contributor, fran townsend, former homeland security adviser to president bush. also with us, national security analyst peter bergen. s
that of the united states in 2027 at 4:00 in the afternoon on the 25th of december. but i wonder what you're telling us about china employs anything more than that. in other words, it's not clear that your civilization state with its tradition of tributary relations with its neighbors and yes, maybe some african countries today, have an aspiration to rule the world. could you tell us if there is, in fact, some prospect of that? that doesn't seem to be in the tradition you're describing. and therefore, why worry? >> well, i think you put your finger on a very important distinction between the chinese tradition and the western tradition. they do share, they both are civilizations which have a strong sense of university. unlike japan for example, which it never did have a. but the way that's expressed is very different. whereas the century the european tradition sought to project it at the time across the world, and i suppose the colonial tradition was the most dramatic illustration of this, the chinese tradition have to do that. and by and large, except on the territory as it were of the chinese conti
focus by the united states on the problems of terrorism and in giving assistance to the government of yemen and following 2003 when there was a sense that al qaeda had been defeat indeed yemen, much of that dropped off. the amount 06 attention, the amount of resources that we gave to yemen dropped off significantly. and since 2006, with the reconstitution of al qaeda in yemen, only platedly has the united states sort of focused again on the problem there and of course the reason why we're talking about it this morning is because omar farooq aomar that took took omar farooq kathwari was coming from yemen. caller: my question is how long have we been with this war against yemen? i mean, i don't mean to go to a conspiracy theory but i read in ha general petraeus and another went down there so when tough head of arms services committee go to yemen, they are not just going to see if it's -- >> well, i wouldn't characterize it at all as a war in yemen. and senator mccain is my former boss. i worked for him for 5 1/2 years on foreign policy and so i can state categorically what was on his
to the united states. meanwhile in yemen, several other countries restricted public access to their embassies today joining the united states and britain. in tonight's lead focus, we have more on the situation in yemen from our german partner. >> reporter: cement barriers block access to the u.s. embassy which has been closed indefinitely. u.s. national security adviser john brennan said the closure was a response to threats from al qaeda. >> i looked at the intelligence that's available as far as the plans for al qaeda to carry out attacks, possibly against our embassy, possibly against u.s. personnel. decided it was the prudent thing to do to shut the embassy but we're working very closely with the yemeni authority to address the threat that's out there. it just demonstrates that al qaeda is determined to carry out these attacks and we're determined to thwart those attacks. >> reporter: yemen is one of the poorest and most politically unstable coue middle east. in recent years, it has become a breeding ground for terrorists. u.s. officials believe they were behind the failed attempt to brin
there is not dissimilar from the screening in the united states, and the screening that abdulmutallab went through was not that dissimilar. we want more explosive detection, more technology. other airports have resisted some of those items, because of other concerns that they have about privacy, for example. this incident is serving as a catalyst to reopen that dialogue, particularly with the airports and countries where we have a large throughput of passengers to the united states. >> i want to get back to that. i assume that there will be another round of questioning. i was shipped off of this to something else why have you here. we all know what has happened in haiti over the last seven to 10 days, it has been devastating. there is an issue about adoption potential, haiti children who had been left without parents. we have about five families here who have completed paperwork to get the children from haiti. and yet they are being held up. i need to get a commitment from you that the citizenship and immigration services will work with my office to help expedite our ability to get those kids out.
-election to the united states senate. on each of these occasions, i have begun my remarks by observing that every important journey in life begins and ends at home. today is no exception. what is different about today, however, is not to announce the beginning of yet another campaign for the united states senate, but rather to announce that after 35 years of representing the people of connecticut and the united states congress, i will not be a candidate for re-election this november. i want to begin these very brief remarks by expressing my deepest gratitude to the wonderful people of connecticut for the remarkable privilege of being elected eight times over the past four decades to our national assembly. you have honored me beyond words with your confidence. let me quickly add that there have been times when my positions and actions have caused some of you to question that confidence. i regret that. but it is equally important that you know that i have never wavered in my determination to do the best job for our state and our nation. i love my job as your senator. i always have, still do. howeve
. one of the findings of the 9/11 commission was the ultimate threat to the united states was when the worst weapons fell into the hands of the worst people. that led congress to create our commission to evaluate what is our level of preparation to avoid the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, particularly into the hands of terrorists. so it was appropriate that we started the day by giving back to the beginnings of this effort with families 9/11. our report on today comes eight years after 9/11. it comes one year after the publication of the report which was entitled world at risk, purposefully titled to indicate this is not one nation's problem, this is a global problem because it is the earth which is at risk, and one month after the failed attempt at an aviation bombing on christmas day there is some good news. the good news is particularly in the area of nuclear terrorism that the trend lines here seem to be running in the right direction. president obama has taken major steps to revitalize the non-proliferation regime and to encourage needed international cooperatio
started talking about a stimulus package in the united states that was coupled -- and i stress this point -- that was coupled with an indication of how we are going to deal with the united states' medium term budget problems. we will see the largest buildup in peacetime public debt. how we deal with that is critical. i was talking about an "l" shaped recovery, i was not really focusing on the downside risks that i see. i would say some of them have been mentioned and have a very good chance of materializing in 200010. -- in 2010. the middle of 2010 is the short term. the long term is beyond 2010. the full risks that i would indicate -- the four risks that i would indicate, and i would put them in the order of the way i worry about them. the first is the situation in europe. philip correctly mentioned parallels with the convertibility plan. these countries really have to be dealing with budget deficits that are in double digits in the middle of a recession without having an exchange rate mechanism or independent monetary policy to deal with it. that is a risk. that is a train wreck waiting
other nation in the united states. there are more is really nasdaq companies than japanese, than canadian and british and german than anything. it's extraordinary. capitalism hasn't been shown to fail. capitalism has been shown to work and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self pity this of course encouraged by the victimhood. one of the things on my radio show is the michael medved show where we are proud to say every day i am not a victim the idea of american victimhood suggests our standard of living and difficulties in our choices it's much lower. we can't live the kind of lives our parents live and it's getting worse and everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. robert wright. heritage in this building has some terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states the progress under the capitalist america particularly since 1980 has been dazzling, unprecedented. the options available to people, the extended life expectancy and for college we are now at a st
to help haiti address its own problems. many haitian americans living in the united states have technical expertise in areas such as agriculture, education, health care and infrastructure and would like to return to haiti to assist their people. my bill creates a mechanism to transfer this knowledge in order to meet the needs and the goals of haiti. beyond that we need to ensure that we find other innovative ways to build human capacity, such through education alex changes, programs like i have proposed and other members, the chirly chisholm act, now more than ever, haiti needs the support of its neighbor to the north. even as we deal with our own problems during these tough economic times, we must not turn a blind eye to the untold human suffering just off our shores. today we express our continued support for haiti, we stand in solidarity with the haitians and the haitian americans who have lost loved ones, with the united states citizens still trapped on the island. we stand in solidarity with the rescue workers who have devoted their time and their treasure to help people they do not
on election 2010. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> i am less interested in passing out blame than i am in learning from and correcting these mistakes to make us safer. for ultimately the buck stops with me. as president i have a solemn responsibility to protect our nation and our people and when the system fails, it is my responsibility. >> president obama taking responsibility this week for america's closest brush with airline terror in years. he suggested no one will be fired at least for now and he ordered a series of reforms including tougher rules for putting people on the no fly list, and more widespread distribution of intelligence reports. the president also renewing his declaration of war on al qaeda and its growing presence in yemen. cnn international security correspondent paula newton is in yemen for us. we'll go to her in a moment. also here in washington are our homeland security correspondent jeanne meserve and former homeland security inspector general clark kent irvin. thanks to al
of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. and i'm delighted to be back here again. now this book, which is a big fat book can be used as a doorstop if you decide not to read it. it will work that way. the title of the book comes in the statement of jefferson. he referred to the united states, jefferson being the most expansive mind and president in history. he referred to the united states and he was president as an empire of liberty, a different kind of empire is what he saw. indeed, as i said, had great visions for the growth of this united states. i've introduced this book with a little brief description of rip van winkle's -- washington irving story, rip van winkle, which i think captures some of the extraordinary changes that took place in this. in 1789 and 1815. in fact, from the revolution to the second decade of the 19th century. irving, who was conservative and conservative sensibilities, wrote the short story which i think is his most famous short story, most of you are familiar with it. in the second decade of the 19th century. i think he was trying to expres
, and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self-pity that is encouraged by the victim. one of the things in my ratio is it's the michael medved show where we're proud to say everyday i am not a victim, the idea of american victimhood suggest that our standard of living and our difficulties and our choices, it's all much lower, we can't live the kind of lives that our parents live and it's getting worse. everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. now, robert rector rodger at heritage writer in the building has done terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states, the progress under capless american, particularly since 1980, has been dazzling, has been unprecedented. the options that are available to people, the extended life expectancy, college, we're now at at a stage where the majority of american young people in every ethnic group, are pursuing some form of post high school graduation after they graduate from high school. this is phenomenal. sometimes that education m
him into the united states and britain. so this is the kind of threat where it's maybe an individual now rather than in one particular cell that al qaeda can utilize in this type of aircraft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinished work today-to-do for the obama administration in reforming the way intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for looking at the problem of signal to noise in the system, wrefb information is shared, how do you distinguish reliable and important information from false reporting and misleading reporting. there's... anyone who works in the system who deals with threat reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noise, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's in great chaos at the moment. there's a civil war in the north draining off a lot of military resources at the moment. there's a separate insurgency which is increasingly violent in the south. the government is running out of money as it loses oil exports and so i think wha
to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, january 21, 2010. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform te duties of the chair. signed: robert c. byrd, presidet pro tempore. mr. mcconnell: madam president? the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: i want to thank the majority leader for giving me the chance to make my very brief opening remarks as i must leave the building shortly. i thank him. mr. president, the senate's newest member is coming down from massachusetts today and we'll have a chance to welcome senator-elect brown to the capitol. obviously, we're delighted to have him. senator-elect brown has captured the attention of the entire country, but he has captured the attention of massachusetts voters
into this al qaeda narrative that says that islam -- the united states is at war with islam. we have to be very careful. it's that narrative that feeds the ranks and builds the ranks of al qaeda. >> reporter: this afternoon, the council on american/islamic relations said the new guidelines amount to racial profiling, though the tsa says the majority of all travelers come to the u.s. will get enhanced screening, not just those from the 14 countries named. wolf? >> do you get the sense this is just the latest step that more are on the way? >> this is definitely an evolutionary process. they want to take some steps immediately. there will be reevaluations, new intelligence that come in, and things will change, i'm sure. >> thank you, jeanne. >>> let's get to the white house where the terror threat is the president's most urgent priority. he's back from vacation. our dan lothian is standing by. dan, the president is getting some high-level briefings today, getting ready for a full-scale meeting with his top advisers tomorrow? >> reporter: he is, wolf. first of all, the president getting an update f
-- the world's leading communication nation, the united states, has been at least until recently outcommunicated by mass murdered living in the most remote areas of afghanistan and pakistan. and we have to take the public information space back from the enemy in order to succeed. and ashley is pioneered such creative ideas as using cell phone technology and such obviously ideas as countering their abuse of low wattage fm station to say terrible lies. next to her, is valley nee 15. he came to us from and has just written another one of the wonderful books. he was working on pakistan for us and not on iran, since that always appeared in the blogs inaccurately. i think we are missing someone. tim who came to us from afghanistan. a representing the future of the foreign service. we have a whole lot of other people in the back there, including in the department, from nine other agent sis plus the state department. strobe, what i'd like to say, the most common question i get in when i walk down the street or run into people is the most valid. why are we in afghanistan? that's a fair qu
more about europe economic difficulti and what they mean for the united states. for that we're joid by one of our regulars. he is from bloomberg busines being. thank you for cing on the program. howould youompare the state of economi recovery in europe veus the utah? > it is not gat for noun. no oneoute now on eitheruds of the pond are in a position to brag. senioriti it is a common language in europe, even with the euro zone yohave a situation marked by e haves and t haves much, much, much, much, hess. it isar more polarized than would you see in michigan. >> breakt town for us more close. how are theountries in eure that matter the most, germany, france, italy and spain, how are they oing? >> we have seen older urm, as some put it, germany, france, somether maurz inestern europe, hold their own. the economies weren't growi that rap you hly that far to beginwith. with the exception of britain, of course. on the flip de of that you have the jump stts. the resurgerients such as spain and lata that reay felt their ecomic growth. and theyaw this newaradigm thinking and they went o and
the united states to have at least one corridor of substantial length that's served by a japanese or a european-style high-speed railroad? >> i think it's important that first off we wait and see what is applied for. you know, obviously i can't start commenting on what we're going to do until applications come forward and are weighed, you know, graded and then approved but clearly again i think we understand the need to ensure that we have very tangible, very, you know, substantial successes. and, you know, clearly again our vision is to follow the model of what the europeans have advanced. you know, keep in mind, when when the system in spain first opened up, you know, again ms. fleming talked about how essentially they begin with one trunk line, they did. they began with their one trunk line. essentially it was six to eight trains a day run being 125 miles an hour and from that they were so successful that they incrementally made the improvements that got them to roughly 20 trains a day at speeds of 200 miles an hour. so this is going to take a buildout, you know, a buildout muc
. four of those teams are from the united states. of course, our fairfax, virginia, team was the first one on the ground and has been actively providing service support and leadership to make sure this effort is coordinated and effective. we continue to send additional capabilities and will continue to send teams, but i believe it is now that there is a significant urban search and rescue effort underway. it is still attempting to save lives that they're still an important open window of time today, tonight, and perhaps even parts of tomorrow when we have the ability to save lives. haitian lives, american lives and the lives of partner government people that are there on the ground. we are also mounting today a major relief operation. this of course has been in planning and works since the beginning of this crisis. the united states is mounting this operation in close coronation between the fema, usaid, a number of other agencies, civilian agencies, and the department of defense that as the president noted yesterday now has the aircraft carrier, the vinson there. and that will dramatic
to the united states, for the purpose of interfearing with the telephone system operated and controlled by the united states of america. if convicted just of these charges and there could be others, the men face each a maximum term of 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000. senator landrieu commenting tonight in a written statement, this is a very unusual situation, she says, and somewhat unsettling for me and my staff. the individuals responsible have been charged with entering federal property with the purpose of committing a felony. it's time to call in richard wolffe, author of "renegade." good evening. >> good evening, keith. >> maliciously interfearing with a telephone system operated and controlled by the united states of america. if some operative, liberal, young liberal with a video camera, were alleged to have done this in the offices of a republican senator somewhere in this country, no matter how rinky dink the operation was or what color hat he was wearing, would they not have already jumped to treason by now? >> it's easy to look at all of this, and you hear about the r
immigrants living here in the united states. because of the earthquake they will be granted 18 months of temporary protective status. >> tps is what it's called. while haitians here see it as an opportunity to push for changes, our ed lavandera says it's not an open invitation for haitians to come over. >> reporter: thousands of haitian immigrants, many in the united states illegally, are applying for what's called temporary protective status or tps. it allows haitian nationals to live in the u.s. legally for the next 18 months. for years, haitian americans lobbied for tps but many advocates now see an opportunity to make bigger changes, to ease years of immigration restrictions towards haitians coming to the united states. >> this now is an opportunity for haiti to change. this is the time right now. and many people this is the last time. a lot of people feel like this is our time. >> reporter: horrifying images like these have been common in the ocean waters between the united states and haiti. it's a dangerous and deadly journey for many who try to make it to american shores. every
in the wake of this, of course, very frightening event that happened on christmas day in the united states when there was a failed bomb attack. people's nerves are very much on edge. there is also a dark humor that permeates some sectors of society. we've heard of different people making jokes in different airports and it is not a joking matter right now. so we know that these people may have been drinking. they've been arrested. >> excuse me for just a second. sky news is interviewing live. they're the fox news equivalent for london. listen. >> did they, from your viewpoint, make their way directly to that passenger? >> in an instant. it happened straight away. they were very efficient and effective in their arrest. >> what reaction from him when he was made aware of what was happening to him? >> he seemed pretty calm. there was no shouting, no screaming. i think he sort of gave in straight away. >> reporter: you say two arrests were made. did you see the second person being taken from the aircraft? >> i didn't see the second person. i heard that through some other passengers on board. >>
there in the middle east. the united states closed its embassy in yemen, citing fears in al qaeda might try to stage an attack. also, britain closing its doors at its embassy there as well. there's still no word as to when either will reopen. meanwhile, breaking news on a related security story. the transportation security administration has just unveiled new directives for certain international flights. samantha hayes joins us live from washington to talk about the new directives and the story developing out of yemen. the new directives in effect tomorrow. >> these are dramatic, brooke. starting tomorrow, tsa is mandating every person flying into the u.s. from or through a country that's a state sponsor of terrorism or other countries of interest will be required to go through a hand screening or secondary screening. that can include body scans, patdowns and other regulations. and this is sure to slow down the boarding process but it also comes after the u.s. government stepping up counterterrorism efforts in yemen which is emerging as a more serious front in the war on terror. on the southern tip
cooperation between intelligence, homeland security, law enforcement, both here within the united states and throughout the world. notwithstanding, these remarkable achievements over the seven years after the enactment of the department of homeland security and some of the extraordinary defenses which occurred in 2009, the record also shows that in 2009, three islamic terrorists broke through our defenses, a man who murdered an army recruiter and little rock, ark. simply because he was wearing the uniform of the u.s. army. the doll house on who murdered 13 americans -- nidal hasan who killed 13 people in fort hood and abdulmutallab. there are clearly some things about our homeland defenses that are not working as we need them to. we need to find out together what is to win on and why and fix it. i know it is probably not realistic to promise the i feel very strongly that that must be our goal. it is the standard that will guide our committee in this inquiry and the other we are conducting on the terrorist attack at fort hood. any recommendations that we make as a result of our inquiry.
. in germany, is "kussler." it is a german name. in the united states it is "kessler." i am not sure if this is a result of american difficulty with foreign languages, although this country is absolutely crammed with people from every country of the world. or maybe it was just before he appeared here and tell people how to pronounce his name. it is generally "kessler." in europe it is "kussler." >> how many years have you spent with him in your life? >> we are talking 20 years. when i say 20 years, i spent that time teaching, so 20 years of vacations interspersed with sabbaticals. >> teaching where? >> i was teaching at cornell until 1994 and then i moved to columbia to teach nonfiction writing and translation which is my other hat that i wear. >> so, you are meeting with him. >> back in 1972, i founded a magazine called "index on censorship." as its name implies, it was about censorship in the arts and censorship of political books as well. i edited this for eight years until 1980 when i resigned to write my first biography which was of another man. souls and need soolzhynitsen i wa
in yemen is an organization that can reach out and touch the united states. that's a major reason general david petraeus went to yemen over the weekend and met with the president there and took messages and we are told pieces of information, and that's a direct quote from a senior u.s. official. pieces of information to president obama. the bottom line they are talking about targeting al qaeda. general petraeus made rare open remarks about yemen over the weekend. >> it's a country that has a lot of challenges. the reduction in oil production, although gas is going up, thankfully. many of the challenges of countries that are in the process of development, rugged terrain, tribal areas and so forth. and so very important, indeed, that yemen has taken the actions that it has, and indeed that not just the united states, but countries in the region, its neighbors and so forth have provided significant assistance. >> what comes next, heidi? yemen has taken actions. there will be more sharing of intelligence and more targeting information, and more training and equipping of yemenen security force
. >>> and united states and great britain closing their embassies in yemen, citing a specific, credible ongoing threat from al qaeda. it's unclear how long the embassies will remain closed. is yemen the new front in the war on terror? we're live in dubai with our security watch this morning. >>> we begin with tough new security measures facing every passenger flying to america from 14 high-risk nations, those nations are considered sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest by the transportation security administration. the new rules take effect this morning. our homeland security correspondent jean mene meserve live. >> reporter: all passengers on flights heading into the united states will be subject to random screening, and those flying in from certain countries will be required to go through enhanced screenings, such as full-body pat-downs, carry on bag searches, full body scanning and explosive detection swabs, this according to a new security directive issued by the transportation security administration, and now in effect. the countries include those that are officially listed by the
, whose the commission of the irs, and jefrey zients, our chief performance officer of the united states. here in our nations capital there are a number of ways to advance the ideals and interests of the american people. often is done through congress. but it can also be done through what's called a presidential memorandum, a directive that i get to cabinet secretaries and federal government employees to change how our government works. in a few moments, i will issue one of these directives to help stop government contracts from going to companies that are seriously delinquent in their taxes. this is not simple a matter of signing a piece of paper or taking a bureaucratic act. by issuing this directive, all of us in washington will be required to be more responsible stewards of your tax dollars. all across this country, there are people who meet their obligations each and everyday. you do your jobs. you support your family's. you pay the taxes you will, because it's a fundamental responsibility of citizenship. and yet somehow, it's become standard practice in washington to give contracts
was the ultimate threat to the united states was when the worst weapons fell into the hands of the worst people. that led congress to create our commission to evaluate what is our level of preparation to avoid the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, particularly into the hands of terrorists. so it was appropriate that we started the day by giving back to the beginnings of this effort with families 9/11. our report on today comes eight years after 9/11. it comes one year after the publication of the report which was entitled world at risk, purposefully titled to indicate this is not one nation's problem, this is a global problem because it is the earth which is at risk, and one month after the failed attempt at an aviation bombing on christmas day there is some good news. the good news is particularly in the area of nuclear terrorism that the trend lines here seem to be running in the right direction. president obama has taken major steps to revitalize the non-proliferation regime and to encourage needed international cooperation. he's committed significant time and energy and resource
. there is a joint effort going on between the united states and the vietnamese government. to date in terms of resources dedicated by the united states on this effort roughly $4 million. just recently announced the contracting of 1.7 million, 1.69 to be more precise for the construction of a secured landfill. now i've been to the facility, and what has been done to date is effectively a containment effort. a way of trying to limit public access to contaminated soil, water, lakes, ponds as well as the creation of a catchment area to catching water that would be contaminated with dioxin so that does not spread further in the ecosystem. but this has now created a new situation which is say having contained the problem they are moving to clean up, and they're at least the last i heard is the question was do you just try to clean it up right away or basically move the contaminated soil out of the area and find a way of cleaning it up later. appears to have chosen to do the latter. that is to say move it to an area in a secure landfill and then find a way of trying to remove the dioxin from the e
has and most importantly visas that will get h into the unite states a britain. so this ishe kind ofhreat whe it's maybe individual now rather than inne particularcell th al qaeda cantilize in ts type of aircft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinishedork today-to-do for the oba administration in reforming the w intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for loong at the probm of signal to noise in the syst, wrefb information is shared, howo you distinguish reliable and important informatio from fae reporting and misleading reporting. ere's... anyone who works in e system who dls with that reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noi, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's inreat chaos at t moment. there's a civil wa in the north draining off a l ofmilitary resources at e moment. there's a separate surgency which increasgly violent in the uth. the govement is running o of moneas it loses oi export and so i think what the u.s. needs to do is rea
? to the countries around him? >> he was a potential threat and that is what i think change in the united states after 9/11. instead of simply dealing with a threat today i think the americans became much more sensitive about potential risks because they had not seen 9/11 coming. we knew very little about afghanistan. we had very little information about afghanistan and out of apparently know where an attack on the most powerful country in the world land straight away the american administration, under pressure from the politicians i met in congress, they were not prepared to tolerate -- [talking over each other] >> whether that was from iraq or >> many other witnesses have talked about the shock effect of 9/11. this change american tolerance of risk. the question i am asking is about the actuality of the risk. weather in actuality he had been contained in a way that he wasn't able seriously to threaten his neighbors. >> the intelligence evidence was that he retained stocks of chemical and indeed biological weapons. and clearly had been prepared to use them against iran and against his own peopl
in the united states and elsewhere and the vietnam war that was fought on the ground if the whole of the vietnam and communist, the rest would quickly follow. the so-called domino effect. as it happened the dominoes fell not in asia in the 1970's but eastern europe in 1989. we shouldn't forget either that thanks largely to the huge population of china, more than one-fifth of humanity still live under what may be regarded as communist rule. up until 1989 there were 16 communist states as i would define them. oddly there are 36 countries today which were at one time communist. that contradiction is to be explained by the fact the soviet union, one state broke up and became 15 states and czechoslovakia and yugoslavia also broke up so there'll be were 16 communist states but there were 36 countries that were communist and today there are five common is countries, china, vietnam, laos, north korea and cuba. the first three have been developing market economies on a substantial private sectors. the hybrid regimes, political economist economically not. china has been described as a state of party cabal
for president and people here in florida and for people all across the united states of america. [cheers and applause] >> i seem to remember coming to tampa two weeks before the election. and you know what i said, this is a quote. people can check. i'm sure it was reported in the newspapers. i said change never comes without a fight. that was true then. it's true now. change never comes without a fight, florida. so i won't stop fighting. i know you won't either. we aren't going to stop fighting to give our kids a world class education, to make college more affordable to make sure that by 2020 we have the highest rate of college attendance than any country in the world. [cheers and applause] >> so we propose that graduates should only pay 10% of their income to pay back their student loans. [cheers and applause] >> and what i have said is we'll forgive student loan after 20 years. but after 10, if you choose a career in public service and if you decide you want to be a teacher, if you decide you want to be a cop, if you're not making huge amounts of money, we don't want to discourage you
people flying into the united states will face tough new security measures. the tsa saying enhanced screening will focus on people flying through countries of interest such as yemen, pakistan and nigeria. the enhanced techniques include full-body patdowns, body scans and thorough searches of carry-on luggage. >>> 2010, as we were saying, good morning to you earlier, it has turned out already fairly deadly for the united states and its allies in afghanistan. nato saying four u.s. service members died in a roadside bomb yesterday. a british soldier was killed in a separate explosion. last year was the bloodiest for coalition forces since the war in afghanistan started. 514 service members died. united states has started deploying 30,000 more troops to fight the taliban. >>> look at this image that we found hanging off a building in former president jimmy carter's hometown of plains, georgia. witnesses told affiliate walb it's an effigy of president obama with a rope around its neck. and one person says it had a sign with the president's name on it. the secret service is now investigat
operation is being done mostly by the united states, by the u.n., by the other foreign and international forces who have been coming here, but everybody is careful to say that it's done in coordination and at the behest of the haitian government. >> christiane, thanks very much. this important programming note. christiane's program will be lived from port-au-prince this sunday, 2:00 p.m. eastern. american donations to earthquake relieved now have topped $355 million, our brian todd has been tracking the flow of aid and the rescue efforts. he found himself at the center of an attempt to save a dying boy's life. >> reporter: those who run critical aid through this airport stung by complaints that supplies aren't touching down when they should, not getting off the tarmac fast enough now say they have streamlined the operation. >> the aid is flowing in, not only from the united states government and the united states military, but all around the world. >> reporter: officials say up to 160 flights a day are coming through, compared with about 25 just after the earthquake, but this is also whe
.s. passport. >> yes. >> reporter: and you've made this trip between the united states and nigeria many, many times? >> yes. about 20 times. >> reporter: really. dating back how far? >> 1995. >> reporter: this is emmanuel's boarding pass from the flight on christmas day, flight 253. >> as the pilot announced the descent into the detroit area, this sound. >> reporter: five rose directly in front of him an explosive device ignites. >> people started screaming, oh, there's smoke, there's smoke. >> reporter: the plane lands and what goes through your mind. >> i just expressed to god thank you for my life. >> reporter: alive, but soon under scrutiny. his name and travel records flash red flags to government officials on the ground. cnn learned emmanuel was tracked in a massive database called taks. >> they were picking some people at random for questioning. >> reporter: did they ever say that you were part of a government database that tracks people when they fly? >> not at all, not at all. >> reporter: the government database houses everything from immigration violations and criminal records to w
pronounce his last name. in germany, is "kussler." in the united states it is "kessler." it is generally "kessler." in europe it is "kussler." >> how many years have you spent with him in your life? >> we are talking 20 years. >> teaching where? >> i was teaching at cornell until 1994 and then i moved to columbia to teach nonfiction writing and translation which is my other hat that i wear. >> so, you are meeting with him. >> back in 1972, i founded a magazine called "index on censorship." it was about censorship in the arts and censorship of political books as well. i edited this for eight years until 1980 when i resigned to write my first biography which was of another man. i was a dinner at david's one evening and he invited arthur koestler to meet me and talk about passing this information on to people who knew that were writing in soviet occupied eastern europe and hungary. >> you said that he spent time in 14 different countries. >> is it 14? i had forgotten the number. >> give us a broad view of where it was. >> he grew up in hungary. his family was thrown out in 1919. they had re
been slow and there has at times been considerable tension between the united states and israel. still a year later, mitchell said last night there had been movement toward a resumption of talks. >> there is, i believe, a strong feeling that the time has come for negotiations to begin. we're getting a lot of encouragement in that regard. >> mitchell says he will be going back to the region in the next few days. and secretary of state hillary clinton is to meet tomorrow with officials from jordan and egypt. if you listen to the israeli and palestinian leadership, the time is right to start talking again. both palestinian president mahmoud abbas and benjamin netanyahu met recently with the egyptian vice president hosni mubarak and both sounded optimistic afterwards. >> i just came from egypt, and i am encouraged by president mubarak for peace talks. i expect and hope to see such a readiness from the palestinian authority. it is time to move the pce process forward. >> we have no objection to negotiations or meetings in principle, and we are not setting any conditions. this issue must be
turn to your own experience of the united states, and i wondered what contrast you saw in your role and in its execution and that of donald rumsfeld of the department of state. and how you would characterize your relationship with rumsfeld? >> well, first of all, i first worked with bill cohen, who is don rumsfeld's previous successor. inevitably individuals bring their own style to bear. i would say that probably initially donald was somewhat -- to use the right word suspicious perhaps of a labour government. he was a republican politician. he had been a congressman many years before. he had previously been secretary of defense. i don't think he was whole persuaded a labour government where he could be comfortable. but he had a admiration with the prime minister and we were able to do business. >> how were you able to allay his suspicions during that period? >> i think by being consistent. i think he was -- i think he was anxious to ensure that people did what they said that they were going to do. >> and did you feel you had a good line of communication with him? that you were gett
for the night states -- the united states need to direct -- differentiate among different countries in the hemisphere. we have different priorities now. we are slow in washington on the hill and in the white house to come to that understanding. host: what is the political landscape in latin america? how has the landscape changed politically down there? guest: there is a much more diverse ideological group of countries such as venezuela and ecuador and bolivia which are not very friendly to the united states or to the market economy. on the other hand, we have a prpragmatic president likelula in central america. we have the problem of cuba and we have a terrible problem with haiti. host: on the issue of haiti, there is an article about a question of commitment and can the united states lead a long effort to rebuild haiti. what will the u.s. effort their say about our overall commitment to latin america in general? guest: the united states is best served by multilateral action. for example, the united nations peacekeeping force in haiti has been let for a number of years successfully
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 243 (some duplicates have been removed)